Hoodman WristShot Camcorder Stabilizer Video Stabilizer Review

Shoot From the Wrist

Every videographer at one time or another has experienced wrist fatigue when shooting handheld on those long drawn-out shoots. Especially when loading your camera with accessories. You get 20 minutes into the shoot and begin thinking, “I should have brought my tripod!” Hoodman’s new WristShot may provide the added wrist support you need for better and longer handheld shooting.

First Glance

Looking at WristShot out of the box reminds me of when I sprained my wrist and had to wear a brace. However, the protruding, pivotal arm brings the coolness factor in. This is much better than a bowling brace or a medical brace, because it’s adjustable to your needs and your camera’s size.

Included in the box are the wrist plates, pivotal arm, a quick release plate that mounts to WristShot and an additional quick release plate for tripod mounting, giving the user versatility without the need to change mounting plates.

The wrist plates are lightweight and are constructed of sturdy hard plastic with a mesh padding on the inside for comfort. Two Velcro straps serve to attach the device to your arm. The pivotal arm is constructed of heavy-duty metal and has three pivot points. It is also adjusted up and down by a sliding groove on the inside wrist plate.

Strapping In

Attaching WristShot for the first time feels a bit awkward and takes a little getting used to. The wrist plates mount to the inside and outside of the forearm and fit comfortably. The Velcro straps make for a nice tight fit. Once all of the fine-tuned adjustments are made, you’re ready for action.

Pictured with the WristShot is a Sony HVR A1U; however, I used a Sony PD170 for the test. I mounted a wireless mic receiver and a camera light for added weight. I felt the benefits of the added wrist support right away, in reduced wrist fatigue and camera stabilization. WristShot also freed my left hand to move about the camera and work the manual controls without the worry of camera shake.

Detaching the camera from WristShot is done easily, using the provided quick-release plate, and the camera can quickly be put back in place using the same method. One thing I did notice was that my right hand was a little constrained, so I found that hitting the start/stop button was a little awkward. This is a minor inconvenience that can easily be overcome, compared to the benefits. After about an hour of carrying the camera around, I noticed quite a bit less fatigue and was surprisingly used to and comfortable with WristShot.

Final Thoughts

WristShot has five axis adjustment options and is designed to fit video cameras up to 10 pounds. You can find a demo video on mounting and using the WristShot at Hoodman’s website: www.hoodmanusa.com. WristShot adds support and stability to handheld shooting for video cameras weighing up to 10 pounds. It does take a little getting used to, just like any new piece of equipment, but the added benefits are worth it. The $200 price tag may be a bit hefty for some, but the doctor bill you would get for treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome would be quite a bit higher.

We passed the Hoodman WristShot around the office, trying it on and conjuring up ideas for its use. Shooting from an open car window or boat without fear of dropping the camera, or taking it hiking were just a few of our ideas. What you can do is limited only by your imagination.

Strengths

  • Reduces wrist fatigue
  • Adds stability

Weaknesses

  • Reduces right hand mobility

SUMMARY

Hoodman’s WristShot is lightweight and easy to use, and it greatly reduces wrist fatigue when handholding video cameras up to 10 pounds.

Brent Holland is a wedding/event video producer and owner of a video production company.

Hoodman Corporation

20445 Gramercy Pl., Ste. 201

Torrance, CA 90501

www.hoodmanusa.com


Price: $200

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