Makeup Precautions
Jim Stinson’s article, “The Art of Appearance” (Nov. 1996) left out a few important tips. In some states,
including where I live, it is illegal to apply makeup to another person unless you are a licensed
cosmetologist. You can instead advise a person how to apply makeup to themselves.

Never apply makeup directly from container to skin unless you plan to throw the product away after using it. Re-using makeup on different people can spread cold sores, rashes and eye infections. Instead, take a small amount of product out, place it on a palette, and use it from there so as not to contaminate the original product. Apply with sponges, brushes or spatulas and discard or sterilize them after each use.

Jeanine Bailey
Corvallis, Montana


A Kindred Spirit on the Sales Floor?
My wife and I are fairly computer literate and are considering upgrading to a computer setup for doing
nonlinear video work.

I am frustrated with the apathy of retailers and dealers toward the emerging world of nonlinear editing. They seem interested in selling only the hot, cheap products for quick bucks–“the fastest to the mostest.” Even though prosumers such as myself make up a relatively small percentage of their customers, it would be nice if retailers had at least one salesperson on the floor who is a knowledgeable video hobbyist. We’re looking for “kindred spirits.” And how about a complete nonlinear editing setup on display to dazzle customers?

Consumers are swimming without life jackets in trying to make sense of the new technologies. I know Videomaker is doing its best to educate. Still, I’m desperate for more information about
nonlinear editing.

Andy Miller
Wilsonville, Oregon


Backup Speed–a Relative Thing
In your November 1996 feature on tape backups (“Digital Insurance”), the writer states that QIC cartridges backup at 60MB per minute. Then he states that digital linear tape (DLT) is faster, yet it only records at 45MB a minute. He goes on to say that DAT is “relatively speedy” at 12 to 15MB a minute. What is wrong with this picture?

Further, QIC tapes cost around $399. The author calls DAT “cheap” at $900. And DLT–$8,000?
What gives?

Malcolm Harter
Birmingham, Michigan

The writer states only that DLT tape is “faster than most other tape options,” not that it’s faster than QIC. The biggest difference between the two is that one DLT tape stores 20GB of information, whereas one QIC tape only stores 3 to 4GB.

When the author says that DAT is inexpensive, he is referring to the price of the tape itself (about $15), not the drive ($900). Similarly, it is the DLT drive that costs you; the cartridges themselves run about $100.

You are on the right track to question why professional hardware costs so much more
than equivalent consumer gear. Why, indeed?

–The Editors


It’s Only an Illusion
Jim Stinson’s October Getting Started column (“The Joy of Sets”) was well written and
informative. However, I just couldn’t believe that pictures 1a and 1b, showing a man descending from a
“phantom” truck, would work on video.

I decided to try duplicating the setup as you showed it and also to try shooting it my way. Our experiment was proceeding nicely (except for a series of strange looks and a few comments from passing motorists), when a police car stopped at our “set.” Have you ever tried to explain to a police officer that you are shooting video of a young woman on a box at the edge of the street because she is getting out of an 18-wheeler that isn’t really there; and we’re at the edge of the street because the truck that isn’t there, for
some reason, let her off in the street, so we can’t show the curb because it isn’t there either, even though
you’re standing on it? The officer was kind enough to volunteer to stop traffic for us and with the
assistance of a friendly truck driver we completed the experiment.
I learned from this adventure that shooting someone getting out of a real truck, while pretending
that it isn’t really there, is not as simple as it sounds. In the end, the box illusion turned out to be the best
idea. Thanks for giving me an excuse to go out and play with my camcorder.

Stan Johnson
Morristown, Tennessee


Correction
The telephone number for Advanced Digital Systems was incorrectly listed in our Guide to
Desktop Video 1996/1997
. The correct number is (800) 888-5244. We apologize for any
inconvenience this may have caused.

Makeup Precautions
Jim Stinson’s article, “The Art of Appearance” (Nov. 1996) left out a few important tips. In some states,
including where I live, it is illegal to apply makeup to another person unless you are a licensed
cosmetologist. You can instead advise a person how to apply makeup to themselves.

Never apply makeup directly from container to skin unless you plan to throw the product away after using it. Re-using makeup on different people can spread cold sores, rashes and eye infections. Instead, take a small amount of product out, place it on a palette, and use it from there so as not to contaminate the original product. Apply with sponges, brushes or spatulas and discard or sterilize them after each use.

Jeanine Bailey
Corvallis, Montana


A Kindred Spirit on the Sales Floor?
My wife and I are fairly computer literate and are considering upgrading to a computer setup for doing
nonlinear video work.

I am frustrated with the apathy of retailers and dealers toward the emerging world of nonlinear editing. They seem interested in selling only the hot, cheap products for quick bucks–“the fastest to the mostest.” Even though prosumers such as myself make up a relatively small percentage of their customers, it would be nice if retailers had at least one salesperson on the floor who is a knowledgeable video hobbyist. We’re looking for “kindred spirits.” And how about a complete nonlinear editing setup on display to dazzle customers?

Consumers are swimming without life jackets in trying to make sense of the new technologies. I know Videomaker is doing its best to educate. Still, I’m desperate for more information about
nonlinear editing.

Andy Miller
Wilsonville, Oregon


Backup Speed–a Relative Thing
In your November 1996 feature on tape backups (“Digital Insurance”), the writer states that QIC cartridges backup at 60MB per minute. Then he states that digital linear tape (DLT) is faster, yet it only records at 45MB a minute. He goes on to say that DAT is “relatively speedy” at 12 to 15MB a minute. What is wrong with this picture?

Further, QIC tapes cost around $399. The author calls DAT “cheap” at $900. And DLT–$8,000?
What gives?

Malcolm Harter
Birmingham, Michigan

The writer states only that DLT tape is “faster than most other tape options,” not that it’s faster than QIC. The biggest difference between the two is that one DLT tape stores 20GB of information, whereas one QIC tape only stores 3 to 4GB.

When the author says that DAT is inexpensive, he is referring to the price of the tape itself (about $15), not the drive ($900). Similarly, it is the DLT drive that costs you; the cartridges themselves run about $100.

You are on the right track to question why professional hardware costs so much more
than equivalent consumer gear. Why, indeed?

–The Editors


It’s Only an Illusion
Jim Stinson’s October Getting Started column (“The Joy of Sets”) was well written and
informative. However, I just couldn’t believe that pictures 1a and 1b, showing a man descending from a
“phantom” truck, would work on video.

I decided to try duplicating the setup as you showed it and also to try shooting it my way. Our experiment was proceeding nicely (except for a series of strange looks and a few comments from passing motorists), when a police car stopped at our “set.” Have you ever tried to explain to a police officer that you are shooting video of a young woman on a box at the edge of the street because she is getting out of an 18-wheeler that isn’t really there; and we’re at the edge of the street because the truck that isn’t there, for
some reason, let her off in the street, so we can’t show the curb because it isn’t there either, even though
you’re standing on it? The officer was kind enough to volunteer to stop traffic for us and with the
assistance of a friendly truck driver we completed the experiment.
I learned from this adventure that shooting someone getting out of a real truck, while pretending
that it isn’t really there, is not as simple as it sounds. In the end, the box illusion turned out to be the best
idea. Thanks for giving me an excuse to go out and play with my camcorder.

Stan Johnson
Morristown, Tennessee


Correction
The telephone number for Advanced Digital Systems was incorrectly listed in our Guide to
Desktop Video 1996/1997
. The correct number is (800) 888-5244. We apologize for any
inconvenience this may have caused.

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