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Is the iPhone Stealing the Low End Camcorder's Job?

Is the iPhone Stealing the Low End Camcorder's Job?
When Steve Jobs announced the ability to record video on the iPhone 3GS back in July, amateur videographers over the world rejoiced the fact that they finally had good reason to buy an iPhone. With the ability to record full SD video at 640x480 in such a tiny package, it seemed like the perfect device to record every kind of noteworthy moment. On the flip side though, professional videographers immediately realized the limitations: the lack of standard attachments, the inability to zoom or change lenses, the lack of manual controls, a microphone that pointed toward the floor while you recorded, and most of all video thats more shaky than a standard political career. Even with these obstacles, iPhone owners still began uploading all kinds of creative content to the web. YouTube alone had over 400% more mobile uploads the week after the iPhone 3GS went up for sale. Even the entertainment industry got onboard with the simplicity of recording video by producing entire music videos with the built in camera and software on the iPhone. Chase Jarvis, an award winning director, who has done campaigns for Mountain Dew and Nikon, even has an entire web site devoted to work thats been done on the iPhone called www.thebestcamera.com. Small camcorders are nothing new. Videomaker reviewed another popular camcorder called the Flip which has a lot of the same advantages as the iPhone. What's interesting is how third party companies found a way to fix the limitations of video on the iPhone. An early example was from accessory makers USB Fever and Factron. They took a shot at solving the iPhone interchangeable lens issue by making small magnetic wide angle and macro lenses that fit right over the iPhones stock lens, giving you up to 40% more viewing range. Even professional camera accessory company Zacuto got in on the action by introducing its Zgrip iPhone Pro, allowing for an adjustable, quick releasable handgrip for shooting more stable video. Unfortunately, this grip was restricted to one hand, making it difficult to keep such a small device steady. One accessory that has come close to solving the iPhones video problems is the OWLE Bubo. Looking more like a big Sega Genesis controller, OWLEs two firm handles finally give videographers a real chance at solving the biggest limitation of the iPhone: super shaky footage. Additionally, OWLE has also taken a note from the devices before it by allowing for interchangeable lenses, a shotgun microphone, and a tripod mount, giving good cinematography on the iPhone a fighting chance. Who knows, with a rig like this and with the tight budgets all around the nations, you might be shooting your next interview in front of an iPhone.
December 22nd, 2009