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Filming an Interview/Product Release

toejamson's picture
Last seen: 1 year 1 month ago
Joined: 07/09/2013 - 9:17am

Hi there,

 

I need to film/edit a couple interviews for people associated with a product release. I currently have a Nikon D3200, so the picture quality is great. As for sound, I'm wondering what the best microphone to use for interviews is that would be compatible with a Nikon D3200.

 

Thank you!


toejamson's picture
Last seen: 1 year 1 month ago
Joined: 07/09/2013 - 9:17am

One more question:

They'll be presenting a powerpoint on a projector or TV. Any lighting tips on making sure the presentation on the screen isn't too bright/nice and clear?


mcrockett's picture
Last seen: 1 day 36 min ago
Joined: 03/05/2013 - 10:29pm
Plus Member

     For an interview, I would recommend a wireless lavalier mic, like a Sennheiser Evolution 100 G3 EW 112P G3 system, or similar, and then record the audio with an audio recorder.

     As far as the presentation goes, you need to decide what the subject of your shot is going to be.  Is it going to be the interviewee, or the presentation?  You may just want to get a copy of the presentation, and when you edit, make cuts or transitions between the subject and the presentation.



Daniel Bruns's picture
Last seen: 1 year 1 month ago
Joined: 12/15/2009 - 7:46pm
Plus Member

Hi Toejamson,

 

I would second mcrockett's lavalier suggestion. The G3 system is the go-to system for professionals everywhere. The reciever and transmitter work from a really long distance away, are small and compact, and are very hard to break (as I found out once when someone landed on a rock with a G3 transmitter attached to their belt). They're definitely on the spendy side, but in my opinion, they're worth every penny.

 

As for lighting, I would definitely try a 3-point lighting set up. I think this would be the most appropriate for an interview set-up. You can find tutorials on three-point lighting all over Videomaker.com (just when you think they couldn't cover the topic any more, they bring out one more article on it), but I've linked a couple here for you to make it easier:

 

 http://www.videomaker.com/article/9736-light-source-three-point-lighting...

 

http://www.videomaker.com/article/13531-three-point-lighting-101

 

http://www.videomaker.com/article/10625-why-three-point-lighting

 

As for the best lighting kit, I would suggest going with LED lights if you can afford it due to their small size, efficient design, long-lasting "bulbs", and adjustable intensity. There are some great and affordable LED lighting kits on B and H Photo Video that I'd recommend. If you want to go with something much cheaper, yet proven, I would then suggest the DV55 light kit from Lowel: http://www.lowel.com/kits/DVcreator55.html. They are really inexpensive, use common light bulbs (read: inexpensive again), has a softbox light that's easy to set up, and has an extra light for backgrounds which can be very helpful. The only thing I don't like about the kits is the light stands that come with them. To me, they are way too flimsy. However, you can just buy some light stands from Photoflex or go professional and get some C-stands and you'd be set!

 

All the best,

 

Dan