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YouTube Problems with Royalty Free Music

Ed Rogers's picture
Last seen: 1 day 2 hours ago
Joined: 02/02/2008 - 2:35am
Plus Member

 I use Sonicfire Pro, by Smartsound Software.  I love the versatility and music selections.  However, I've been getting fraudulent claims from a variety of music distribution companies:  Kontor New Media, INgrooves, SME, etc.  I've provided proof, to include a letter from one of the vice presidents of Smartsound, but only had limited success in defending myself.  This affects my "Revenue Sharing" as the videos are automatically excluded from this program.  Is anyone else having issues with their royalty free music libraries?


Ed Rogers's picture
Last seen: 1 day 2 hours ago
Joined: 02/02/2008 - 2:35am
Plus Member

Oops!  A mea culpa here.  Although the music I inserted in my video was royalty free, I neglected to account for what the DJ was playing.  So, please learn from my mistake ;)


Kenaudio's picture
Last seen: 2 years 3 months ago
Joined: 04/29/2012 - 1:40am

This is the biggest shame ever!

Kontor and other digital distributor also claimed my own written music which is distributed by another digital distributor and competitor in this market. The evil about this is, that those companys who claim, will earn the google money as long as another notices that his song has been claimed. So these evil companys make other people's money instead.

In Hamburg are several of these companies...and we started fighting against each other:-)....

So....Just send them your proof that it is free music and fight against them!

Still in rage:-)...

Kenaudio


Gregory Watts's picture
Last seen: 1 year 3 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 2:31am

You cannot win against Youtube. YouTube just lost their battle in German courts over copyrighted music on Youtube.

http://www.digitaltrends.com/international/german-court-rules-against-youtube-in-copyright-case/

With fines and video removals Youtube is hurting. This case of course has put Youtube on the defensive. Any major player that makes any claim Youtube will most likely accept and believe. I tried to fight Youtube with Kevin MacLeod's music, even Kevin the producer tried to fight them. You can't fight Youtube. This German case has set a precedent, other courts currently considering similar cases will most likely now pass judgement against Youtube. Ever giant must fall. Youtube has (believe it or not) been a money looser. Google will not hold onto it as it is. Either they will strip the rights of Joe uploaded and go completely commercial or they will sell Youtube.

 "A Photo Captures but a Moment in Time: Video Captures a Lifetime in a Moment"


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 1 year 11 months ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
Plus Member Moderator

There is a known problem with SonicFire Pro music being mistaken for other music - I have had five or six videos flagged for this reason. I called SmartSound customer service about this and was told to just dispute the claim, which does work just fine and takes only minutes.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


theonecanoe's picture
Last seen: 7 hours 14 min ago
Joined: 08/31/2011 - 4:20pm

I too, have used Sonicfire created music and have had others claim it to belong to them. Disputing the claim with YouTube has gone nowhere. Very frustrating to say the least!



Kenaudio's picture
Last seen: 2 years 3 months ago
Joined: 04/29/2012 - 1:40am

@Tasana:

"You cannot win against Youtube. YouTube just lost their battle in German courts over copyrighted music on Youtube."

<span style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469);">Tasana, this doesn't have anything to do why songs and videos are claimed by digital distributors like kontor as mentioned above.</span>

<span style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469);"></span><span style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469);">In Germany it's the royalty collecting GEMA, 800.000.000 Euros income per year appr and not sooooo small. They want money from YouTube for streaming their catalogue and for me it's fair and okay because YouTube or so to say google earns loads of money with other people's music!</span>



Ed Rogers's picture
Last seen: 1 day 2 hours ago
Joined: 02/02/2008 - 2:35am
Plus Member

For me, I primarily have had problems from BFM Digital.  I can't believe the copyright Cops will bust you for music the DJ plays!!!

I have a feeling that we're just beginning to have troubles with "Big Brother".  Whether or not you're on Vimeo, YouTube or any other video site.  We're gonna have to figure out how to hold our own.  In my case, I had to prove that I actually purchased the license. I also provided a letter from one of Smartsounds vice presidents...


brunerww's picture
Last seen: 2 days 12 hours ago
Joined: 06/09/2011 - 6:40am
Plus Member

I use freestockmusic.com - they flagged me once, and blocked me from making money with ads on one of my videos. I disputed it immediately, and sent them a link to the freestockmusic license. YouTube re-monetized my video a few days later and I haven't had the problem since.

YouTube is a business, not a charity. They're trying to make money and not get sued - so they asked for proof that I had the rights to the material that I uploaded (for which they are legally liable). That makes sense to me - I'm trying to make money and not get sued too ;-)

Cheers,

Bill

Hybrid Camera Revolution



Charles Schultz's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 10:38pm

This is another reason I only work with bands that have original music. I don't want the headache of cover bands.


Ed Rogers's picture
Last seen: 1 day 2 hours ago
Joined: 02/02/2008 - 2:35am
Plus Member

 Sometimes you don't know the type of musicians that you'd like to associate with.  I suppose this forum might be a valuable resource in that regard, I've never tried.

Regardless, having a stock library is SOOooo convenient, I'll put up with the hassles...for now ;)


dagunner's picture
Last seen: 6 months 4 weeks ago
Joined: 07/02/2009 - 2:25am

I stick to the CC-by music on CCmixter.org

I never had a problem with You tube with this music.You tubequestioned me onmusic from Sony Vegas Pro before. I dont use the music provided with software at all anymore. I have no association with CCmixter other than loving to search for the good cuts of music and conversing with the artists.


georgeroyter's picture
Last seen: 10 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 04/29/2011 - 1:05am

I compose my own background music for my videos and I have also had YouTube question my ownership. I mainly upload to Vimeo, never had a problem there, and I preferVimeo to YouTube.


Woody Sanford's picture
Last seen: 3 months 1 week ago
Joined: 10/19/2010 - 7:33am
Plus Member

Part of the problem is in titles. They use key words like SEO for websites to find things. Some royalty free stuff is similar to a popular song and will use a similar title and some I'm sure wind up with a similar title by chance.

The only only two times I ever had a problem was once with a Ted Nugent song but I had the release from Nugent and that cleared that up with Sony Entertainment. The other time was with a test video of an underwater camera I shot at Shearon Harris Reservoir in NC. There is an artist by the name of Shearon Harris I guess and I used the name of the lake in the title. The video had no audio what so ever as the camera can not capture it and I didn't add anything. I went round and round with them on that one. So some of this is automated.

Which brings up the issue if you do any video SEO for anyone by uploading a transcript along with it. A lot of people think you can SEO by piggy backing on something popular (a name or phrase) but it can get you busted by the youtube copyright software and cause you problems.

food for thought


Anonymous (not verified)

I too make my own music and have so far not been messed with, despite having done some "sound-a-like" songs.

I hadn't heard that Youtube was losing money before. News to me.


Jack Wolcott's picture
Last seen: 7 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 01/02/2008 - 11:51pm
Plus Member

This is a hugely complex area of law, one which U.S. copyright law really doesn't define with clarity. The issues associated with "fair use" and "de minimis" are the subject of a great deal of case law and to say that they are gray and foggy is to say that the Titanic had a run of bad luck!

I have read and re-read both the law itself and the results of quite a few cases of so-called copyright infringement defended by attorneys who invoke "fair use" and "de minimis" and have come away bewildered by it all. I'm not an attorney: the copyright code is incomprehensible to a ordinary citizen as well at to attorneys and judges.

I suspect that You Tube and others, to avoid having to get into the fray, have decided that any music or image that even faintly smells of copyright must be excluded, placing the burden of permission entirely on us, the content creators.

Like composit1, I rarely post to You Tube myself and never, ever, post for a client. If I need to share a video clip I either post it on my own web site or create a link on my web site to the material on my client's site.

Jack

VideOccasions


paulears's picture
Last seen: 1 week 7 hours ago
Joined: 11/05/2006 - 8:36am

I always offer my clients options on music - so if they have some kind of preference, I give them the option (and cost) of the original or suggest they consider me producing them something similar, but different, that they can use without worries of licenses. I produce what they want in the studio and then grant them permission to use it for any purpose for a period of two years. Most products won't be used after that time, so I retain the copyright and can use it again if I wish. Oddly, I too have had Youtube question the copyright - but I certified I owned the material and they accepted it.


Ed
Ed's picture
Last seen: 1 day 23 hours ago
Joined: 07/03/2012 - 2:02am
Plus Member

Copyright trolling is becoming a major league sport on Youtube. I had one such outfit file a claim with a YT video I'd posted. I used stock music from FootageFirm. YT asked for my response. I told them the challenger was a troll, and to use Google to look them up. About one week later, the claim was dismissed.

These trolls use spiders to search for anything and often file dozens of challenges. Google needs to screen these clowns, block their IP addresses, and routinely dismiss any challenge from them.


Anonymous (not verified)

YouTube has really gone off the deep end in their ruthless "witch-hunt", even to the point of penalizing paying Sound Exchange members! We've had enough of their bogus claims and strong-arm tactics-our account is closed and we moved everything over to Vimeo. Their site is much more professional-looking, and they don't needlessly hassle their clients. Just goes to show-there IS life after YouTube!


Ed Rogers's picture
Last seen: 1 day 2 hours ago
Joined: 02/02/2008 - 2:35am
Plus Member

Paula, Vimeo is another avenue. I just wonder how long it will take the "trolls" to migrate to it...


paulears's picture
Last seen: 1 week 7 hours ago
Joined: 11/05/2006 - 8:36am

I have a suspicion that the Royalty Free suppliers often encourage youtube. Many Royalty Free products require a one-off payment, so are NOT copyright free. I suspect they are trying to encourage people to buy it. If you have paid for royalty free material, you cannot share it with a colleague and then have them use it free in most cases. This I strongly suspect is what is happening. YTs own search system could be correctly identifying the 'free' music.

Unless the music producers keep their material to themselves, youtube will spot it. I'm using guesswork, but I wonder if youtube look for repeats of music - so when they find 6 or 7 videos with the same fingerprint, common sense would flag it as an infringement. Any form of repetition is what the automated systems will detect. The fact you have permission is for arguing later?


NoDollars's picture
Last seen: 8 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 11/25/2013 - 8:48am

"Don't let the bastards get you down" is the slogan from a figurine I have on my desk. Google/YouTube is in the business of making money not arbitration.(who it right or wrong) They may consider your "Revenue Sharing" problems as a mite on a flea on the back of a Camel. Did you ever notice there are NO, "contact us" links on YouTube pages? They take the cream off the top and leave the skim milk for the peasants. You can't win this one even if you are right... move on.


Bradley Hale's picture
Last seen: 4 months 1 week ago
Joined: 06/06/2013 - 9:05am

I am a videographer for a friends cover band.Youtube tagged and deleted audio on several songs,but i some how  convince them that the band made no money on the performance in question.I was given a list of publishing companies that had song rights.The publishing right services were to reply to youtubes flagging,but instead they all told youtube to undo the audio muting of my videos.One person from Warner brother commented  that the cover of Paranoid by Black Sabbath was well done.


Dan O&#039;Connor's picture
Last seen: 6 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 08/03/2009 - 12:12am

Yes, anytime you use royalty free sounds that are accessible to other music producers to incorporate into their work, then this can happen.

 

The problem is that music that uses Sonicfire Pro, Sony ACID loops, Garage band loops, etc. should not be allowed in the YouTube Content ID system.

 

YouTube simply does not understand this issue and has no real reason to.

 

Dan-O FREE Royalty Free Music Producer

http://www.danosongs.com