You are here

Should I convert mpeg/wmv files to another format then burn to DVD??

lovebaseball62's picture
Last seen: 3 years 7 hours ago
Joined: 07/24/2011 - 12:17am

Please help with your advice?! Thanks...I have several hundred files (sports related stuff) in either mpeg or wmv format that I need to put onto DVDs for distribution to friends and clients that they can watch on regular DVD players...but should I burn the mpegs and wmvs to DVD or convert them to a different and better format for DVD burn?? (I use the free software "Any Video Converter" to convert)....Please advise? Thank you....


Charles Schultz's picture
Last seen: 1 year 3 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 10:38pm

What program will you be using to create the DVD? If it is Adobe Encore you should not have to, that is the only program I have worked with to burn DVD's.


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
Plus Member Moderator

Whatever you render your video out to, the software that burns your DVD's will convert them to MPEG2 for video and AC3 for audio (assuming no Dolby 5.1).

If you were to copy the VOB files from your DVD's to your hard drive and rename them *.MPG, they will play on your PC just like any other MPG2 file.

So to answer your question, if your target is DVD, render to MPEG2.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


kfal's picture
Last seen: 5 months 4 days ago
Joined: 01/26/2014 - 1:12pm

Hi, I have 4 vob files I need to burn to dvd, but one of the files (no. 2)  I need to edit (trim\split).  The only program I know to do this in is Windows Live Gallery, but once I edit the file it becomes a wmv file.  I tried burning the vob and wmv files to disk, but it errored out when I tried playing it in the dvd player.  So, I'm guessing the formats have to be the same, so how do I edit the vob file so it STAYS a vob file? or if I need to convert the wmv file, what do I need to do so it plays as the number 2 spot that it originally was (or plays sequentially) on the dvd?


Luis Maymi's picture
Last seen: 4 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 09/26/2008 - 4:58am
Plus Member

Like Charles mentioned, with Encore you can use almost any video format. I use H.264 to save space, but it should be done in MPEG2 DVD because it separates the video and the audio (which is good if you want to have two different audio selection)

-

"The meaning of a movie are the characters, the life of the movie is the music, but the magic is in the editing" –  http://www.lomaymi.com


ninquelote's picture
Last seen: 1 year 5 months ago
Joined: 08/03/2011 - 4:51am

To burn a DVD that you want to play on commercial DVD players, you have to use the mpeg2 codec. Even if you export your video in another codec, such as h.264, the authoring program you use (Encore, DVD Studio, any of them) will re-compress your footage to mpeg2 because that is the only codec that DVD players recognize.

So to answer your question, always export your footage initially to mpeg2 DVD other wise you will just be compressing your footage twice and possibly compromising the visual quality of your video. By the way, the mpeg2 extension most often looks like .m2v, and only holds the video. The audio should automatically come out separately as a wav or AC3 file depending on the program you use to export it.


artsmith's picture
Last seen: 1 month 3 days ago
Joined: 03/02/2011 - 9:06pm

'Lovebaseball', the DVD-standard calls for mpg2 as the format, so converting to anything else, simply means that the material will, ultimately, be converted back to mpg2 in any case. If youwish to preserve as much quality as possible, set the 'quality', if it is adjustable, fairly high. That way, you will achieve the best possible resultsat the expense of slightly bigger files. I usuallyuse variable bit-rate and 'double-pass'. That way you can push the upper setting to 9200 and let the bottom setting 'float', giving an average which still squeaks into the DVD-standard. However, if time (processing, that is), is 'of-the-essence' do not attempt double-pass, just bash the stuff through the processand settle for what comes-out.


PsiKnife's picture
Last seen: 6 months 1 week ago
Joined: 03/28/2013 - 7:03am

If you're using Windows XP, Windows Movie Maker is included with the OS (and as a d/l with Vista/7), and with k-lite installed it should find the codecs for dealing with MPEG and WMV. That, if nothing else, should give you some options on compression/quality before a burn. I use DVD Creator, which should work fine for you, doing conversion and burning all in one place.source: http://www.appgeeker.com/convert/burn-wmv-to-dvd.html


kfal's picture
Last seen: 5 months 4 days ago
Joined: 01/26/2014 - 1:12pm

Hi, I have recently been uploading my old home movies to my computer using Pinnacle Dazzle.  I then burn them to dvds (+r  rw 4.7gb).   My questions are: #1 I just started editing 2 vob files using Windows Live Gallery splitting out unwanted footage.  Then I save it & it becomes a wmf file.  So, can I burn 2 vob files + my wmf file to a dvd?   #2 If I can burn them to a dvd, how do I know the video will play in chronological order?   thank you.


yawafrifa2000's picture
Last seen: 3 months 6 days ago
Joined: 06/28/2012 - 6:20pm

AVC will do the job

Since you said you use the freeware Any Video Convertor, you should have no problem. That program has a DVD option that will do the required tasks for you. Simply add the files you want to burn, select the DVD option, insert a blank DVD-R media in your DVD-RW drive, and click Convert. AVC has a built-in burner so it will burn to the disk as soon as the convertion is done. Do some trial tests first; it should be simple. Good luck.


kfal's picture
Last seen: 5 months 4 days ago
Joined: 01/26/2014 - 1:12pm

I guess what I'm asking is if i have a vob file I need to trim\split how do i keep it a vob file?  Do I use AVC to edit it?  also, can I rename it so it burns in the correct chronological sequence, for example I have vob1, vob2, vob3, vob4 and vob2 is the video I need to trim\split.  How do I keep it the #2 so it plays sequentially?  thanks