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Interview Lighting, Softbox & Reflector Advice Needed

milkyc's picture
Last seen: 3 years 9 months ago
Joined: 11/23/2010 - 12:54pm

Hi,

I will be filming some interviews this weekend which are personal recollections from the past.

Please could someone advise me the best way to light my subjects to create a less-corporate look and to create something more warmer without losing too much loss of light to help maintain video quality.

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The equipment I have:

CANON XM2/GL2 CAMERA

2 X 40cmX60cm SOFTBOXES WITH (2x 125w 5400k ra>90 daylight bulbs)

1 X SILVER/GOLD REFLECTOR
KIT REFLECTOR + STAND DYNASUN RE2018 SILVER/GOLD 70x110 on eBay (end time 18-Dec-10 15:27:47 GMT)

1 X SMALL PAR SPOT

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Any advice/techniques are more then welcome.

This will be filmed within a hotel's meeting room which I'm guessing (but not yet checked) will be quite clean/white/brightly lit before my lighting is added/replaced.

Many thanks in advance

Mike


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 1 year 11 months ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
Plus Member Moderator

An interesting look might be to darken the room and only well light the person being interviewed (particularly the face in tight shots). Since you are using daylight bulbs, you could look around for some warmer ones or adjust the colors in post.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


composite1's picture
Last seen: 5 months 1 week ago
Joined: 12/11/2008 - 7:54pm
Plus Member Moderator

Milky,

Before you choose a lighting setup, find out what the 'tone' of the project is and set your lighting scheme around that. That means if they're going for a 'hard-charger' feel, you're not going to want to light them with a romantic 'potpourri' look. Remember that you're 'painting the scene' with light. Get your hands on some old Masters portrait books and see how they lit their scenes. You'll no doubt find something that will fit the mood of your upcoming shoot.

H.Wolfgang Porter, Composite Media Producer Dreaded Enterprises Unlimited, Inc. www.dreadedenterprises.com


milkyc's picture
Last seen: 3 years 9 months ago
Joined: 11/23/2010 - 12:54pm

Thanks for your time and advice, I think I will try and adjust the colors in post first using the daylight bulbs. That way I know the video will be clear enough for me to work with, as this is the first time I've used lighting within my work.

I think I will try and get rid of all artificial light from the room and use just my lighting and gold reflector to see what I can create. I hope the room isn't just a plain white room with no character as that will make it harder to work with. It's my decision finally to make the decision of the 'tone' of the project. I think the client will be happy for what ever I create, just best obviously to use my tools to the best of my abilities. What are 'old Masters portrait books' please as I have never heard of these.

Mike


composite1's picture
Last seen: 5 months 1 week ago
Joined: 12/11/2008 - 7:54pm
Plus Member Moderator

"I think I will try and adjust the colors in post first using the daylight bulbs."

Milky,

Lights don't make your video 'clearer'. You have to properly expose your shots according to the light you have available. In your case, the light available will be electric lights instead of sunlight. It is the amount of light you have available in your scene which will determine your exposure settings. The only thing 'daylight bulbs' will do is simulate sunlight. If your scene requires 'fake sunlight' then daylight bulbs are an excellent choice when you can't use sunlight. Otherwise standard white indoor lighting (tungsten or indoor compact fluorescent bulbs) will do just fine. If you have to 'fix' your lighting during post-production, you've already screwed up and may not be able to.

"What are 'old Masters portrait books' please as I have never heard of these."

Go to your local library (preferably) or search on-line for books and info on master painters like Da Vinci, Rubens, Van Der Meer, Raphael, or any of the 'Neo-Classical' or 'Romantic' Era painters and look at their portraits. These guys were masters of single, 3-point and 5-point lighting long before anyone shot a frame of film or video. If you want to see how lighting sets the mood or tone of a scene get your hands on some books or see the images online of the work the old masters made. They can be a great influence on you and your work. Also look at the free training videos on lighting here at VM. The old masters can show you what you can achieve and the videos will show you the basic tools to figure out how to do it.

The difference in 'just giving the client something' and giving them something 'they will remember' and call you back for further work all depends on how much 'extra' work you put in creating 'production value' in the final product. Anybody can 'stick' some lights on a set, but only someone who's taken the time to find out where best to put the light will stand out from the rest of the pack. Think of the movies and tv shows where you 'fell in love with an actress'. More often than not it wasn't because she was anymore beautiful than any other woman, it was due to how well she was lit. Same goes for your clients.

Lighting can make a client look powerful, sympathetic, inspiring or just plain awful depending on how you go about setting it up. The last thing you want to do is lose a client because you made them look like $%^&! because you either didn't have the knowledge or were too lazy to take the steps to give them what they were paying for. If you didn't light them well during the shoot, there's no 'whiz-bang' trick you can pull off in post to fix it. 'Crap in is crap out'.

H.Wolfgang Porter, Composite Media Producer Dreaded Enterprises Unlimited, Inc. www.dreadedenterprises.com