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Im new, would like advice

ikswotug's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 06/20/2012 - 10:51am

just want to get a feel for the forum and wondering what kind of advice everyone has for me...little background on me, i used to work at a local news station in omaha, ne and got started being interested in video production since high school...been out of the game so to speak for a few years now, but i now have some money to put forward and start at i would say a prosumer level...any ideas as far as to focus on certain projects that will make me more employable in the future?, (since i will need to get acquainted with the equipment, knock the rust of my skills) if you want to see the little i have done so far, there is my youtube channel (7 videos that are underwhelming to say the least lol)

thanks for your time


Luis Maymi's picture
Last seen: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Joined: 09/26/2008 - 4:58am
Plus Member

Welcome to Videomaker forums Gut.

What exactly do you want to do in video production? Weddings, photo montages, short films? If you tell us about the projects you're interested in doing we may be able to help you better.

-

"The meaning of a movie are the characters, the life of the movie is the music, but the magic is in the editing" –  http://www.lomaymi.com


ikswotug's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 06/20/2012 - 10:51am

well frankly i have the goal of eventually creating feature length documentaries, but to start i think short films, music videos and news style packages(since i can make those with ease with the proper equipment, i would like to avoid the whole wedding video production at least in a solo capacity
but i am not opposed to doing more

thanks for the welcome


Luis Maymi's picture
Last seen: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Joined: 09/26/2008 - 4:58am
Plus Member

Hello Gut

Feature length documentaries takes a considerable amount of time to make and you need to invest a couple of big bucks to get it done. Videomaker has wrote several articles about documentary production which you can take a look at. What Irecommendis to produce a simpledocumentary of your own liking to test the genre. Although you may not make any money out of it you will have fun doing it. In my case I recorded a mini documentary of a day with my grandfather. I'm will not make any money at all with it (I don't want to), but that mini documentary is worth a lot for me and my family members.

Short films are to experiment, learn new skills and meet people. The chances of making money with short films is almost none. How many are making short films and uploading them to YouTube with hopes they go viral?

With music videos and news style packages you could make money without investing a ton of money. I also agree to avoid wedding videos because they do not generate a desirable income for the amount of work put into it. In my personal opinion (and experience) doing photo montages is an excellent way to make some income without to much hard work. The key is knowing how to market your montage services. I have a book called "Make Money Marketing & Producing Photo Montages: The Complete Guide"written by one of Videomaker forum moderators (Earlc) which has been incredibly helpful with ideas on how to market my photo montage services.

What I learn with my video production business is that you need to make money to invest money. Video equipment is expensive and if you spend your time making projects that will not make you any money, well you will be losing time, which means you will be losing money. The key thing in all of this is to have fun in every single project you do. That will always keep your business going.

PS: What's your YouTube channel URL?

-

"The meaning of a movie are the characters, the life of the movie is the music, but the magic is in the editing" –  http://www.lomaymi.com


EarlC's picture
Last seen: 3 hours 43 min ago
Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am
Plus Member Moderator

As Luis notes, there's a boatload of video business opportunities out there, you just have to pick a spot and get your feet wet. Actually, mentioning your interest in music video production, you wouldn't have to go very far or search very hard to find some starving artists, musicians, garage or local bands that would snap up just about anything you have to offer. They range in pay from free to cheap, to below average because most of these guys are sinking every available dime and maxing out their credit cards on equipment, promotional materials (no, not your video ... mostly CDs of their music, t-shirts and stuff) and gas to get from gig to gig. HOWEVER, the plus side to this is they can be very loyal and will often drag you along with them on road trips, providing you with some excellent opportunities to do some band on the road related documentaries. That could be cool and fun, while rubbing the rust off your old skills and shining up some new ones.

There's probably NOT a true get rich quick scheme to working as an independent professional video services provider, but I suspect you'd get a lot of response by using whatever means available to get the word out to these bands who haven't "made it" yet. Just go where they play, where they practice or hang out, and pass out your business cards. Work some deals in cash, trade or splits of the DVDs you create from their practice sessions, live gigs or road trips.



ikswotug's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 06/20/2012 - 10:51am

figured you guys would also be interested in what equipment i plan on purchasing, currently i have budgeted $7000 to get set up, to include camera/peripherals, editing software and computer to run the software as intended and store a video library...what i have picked out so far

Panasonic AG-HMC40 with xlr adapter, 2 large batteries, battery charger

Audio Technica AT875

Manfrotto 128RC QR Micro Fluid Head and tripod legs

Contour Design Shuttle-Xpress NLE Multimedia Controller

total approx $3000(based on b&h)

Adobe Creative Suite 6 Production Premium

$1800(b&h)

which leaves me about $2200 for the editing station (looking at an hp, but could also end up building one myself)

any thoughts would be welcome, im not dead set on anything right now, and the budget could go higher, but not too much ;)


saltlakestudio's picture
Last seen: 11 months 1 day ago
Joined: 05/28/2012 - 5:38am

Hi Gut! Welcome to videomaker forum! I have a question? Are you planning to start a video production company?


ikswotug's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 06/20/2012 - 10:51am

thanks for the welcome andrew, to answer your question i have thought about that as a real possibility, as it sits right now i would like to work my way back into video production since i have been away from it for a while. i think once i feel my skills are up to par and at a professional standard i might look into that...i will remain open minded about it...if im able to build one and make it profitable enough to where i am comfortable than i would be in heaven


Theresa Desaulniers's picture
Last seen: 1 month 4 weeks ago
Joined: 02/27/2011 - 11:39pm
Plus Member

You say nothing about lighting.

I'd also improve the audio set up. At least get a lav. or two.

One camera? Not enough. get two.


ikswotug's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 06/20/2012 - 10:51am

initially this will be a "1 man band" so getting a second cam initially doesnt do me much good...next on the list of purchases with be wireless lavs then some sort of on camera lighting, i figure the shotgun mic will do a solid enough job for a man on the street interview as long as they stay on the mark...i am realistic in knowing im not going to be a turnkey pro with what i am buying ;)...i do have the feeling that any cash i earn related to my video production will go into getting a better set up...


EarlC's picture
Last seen: 3 hours 43 min ago
Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am
Plus Member Moderator

For EVERYTHING other than event video production, one camera is sufficient.


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 1 year 7 months ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
Plus Member Moderator

I hate differing from Earl, as he's usually right, but for TV style interviews I find it best to use one camera wide showing all persons with one tight on each interviewee. If you have an extra you could also shoot interviewer at the same time but you can always get them later.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


EarlC's picture
Last seen: 3 hours 43 min ago
Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am
Plus Member Moderator

Bruce, we all know there's no ONE RIGHT WAY. I do like and have two matched units because I also do a LOT of event video production calling for at least two angles. However, most of my short segments for local cable, interviews, commercial productions, etc. while it is a bit more time consuming, I set up one camera for each of the angles I want. This redundant interview process not only gives me unique and controlled angles from the POV you indicate, but usually also results in one or the other of responses, questions, delivery, articulation, etc. to be clearer or better than the others. Aside from the occasional lip sync issues, this has worked for me, especially in tight spaces and when I'm the lone operator. I sometimes have to shift the lighting, and I agree that using three cameras, even lockdowns, with or without operators, and setting up all the lighting angles might prove an easier shoot, notwithstanding the setup involved, I like the approach I use as well. We're all good, my friend. We're all good. ;-)


ikswotug's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 06/20/2012 - 10:51am

birdcat i agree with you and earl 100%, i know for certain i am years away from conducting deliberate group interviews. dont get me wrong i WANT to have multiple cams, but this is just the plan for the initial purchase, the sad part is i can only devote so much time to my video work until around next april (under a contract that doesnt like to share my time, to put it lightly )



Art White's picture
Last seen: 2 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 10/19/2010 - 7:18pm
Plus Member

Welcome Gut! My best advice (usually don't have any cuz I'm relatively new too) Is listen to the folks on this Forum. I have never had anyone steer me wrong. I silently learn a lot from Birdcat because I read a lot. Earl C is great. He will give you anything including his grey hair cuz I've given him most of it with my elementary questions that he happily answers. Glean from everyone, develope your style call it your own and enjoy!

Flex Media LLC
Your Flexible Media Soulutions
www.flexmedia.tv


EarlC's picture
Last seen: 3 hours 43 min ago
Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am
Plus Member Moderator

Thanks, Gut, I look forward to hearing from you after you've read it and put some of the information to work. And Artis, Flex Media, is a good guy even though he does try to make people blush. He's one of the good guys, along with a boatload of others here. If I listed them all I'd run out of bandwidth. This is one of the most informative, open-minded and professionally courteous video related forums OUT THERE. Believe me I know as I've participated with many others. The people here are real, serious, enjoy video and love to share. Absolutely the best magazine and forum on video!


ikswotug's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 06/20/2012 - 10:51am

from what i have read so far it seems to be the case...except for the software pissing contests ;)...even those give good advice from people who at least are good at looking like they know what they are talking about... at the risk of sounding self absorbed i think i have a decent amount of talent as far as post production goes, i figure that i can combine that, the advice from here and real world exp. and turn what will start as a hobby into at least a supplementary income...also i am very thick skinned and take constructive criticism very well, so if im way off base with something, call me out on it &^^&