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Help! How would you light this?

daxalain5's picture
Last seen: 3 years 1 month ago
Joined: 09/20/2011 - 7:24pm

Hello there! Here are 3 different angles of the spot that I need to light. Just to give you guys an idea:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151193744638906&set=a.10151193744313906.540128.747143905&type=3&theater

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151193744963906&set=a.10151193744313906.540128.747143905&type=3&theater

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151193745383906&set=a.10151193744313906.540128.747143905&type=3&theater

The scene: That there will pe a couple of people sitting already and have a business guy walk in (like a business meeting scenario) and shoot it for at least 5 seconds.

For the lighting set up, I am thinking of just entirely blocking all of the windows with some black cloth and use artificial lighting (not sure if they will put blinds in the next 2 wks because the whole place is still in construction). I have this kit right here:http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/285778-REG/Lowel_DVC_91LB_DV_Core_250_Kit.html

Here is my plan: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151193806363906&set=a.10151193744313906.540128.747143905&type=3&theater

Am I in the right direction? I will gladly listen to any feedback from you guys. It will be very much appreciated!

:)


BruceMol's picture
Last seen: 1 day 15 hours ago
Joined: 03/11/2008 - 10:35pm

I've run into this situation a lot - bright sunlight entering a room. I went to a fabric store and bought black gauze material to put on the outside of the window. The gauze just takes the brightness level down a bit and really doesn't affect the colour of the outdoor scene much. However...if there is wind the gauze really has to be taped down securely. And I just realized another thing about your particular set up of windows, they are wide! The material I bought 'off the bolt' would not be wide enough to go seamlessly across that window set. Plan B to reduce, but not black out, the window light would be to find a way to shade the window. (I seriously doubt the building owners would appreciate that sort of structure!) My thought is, if you can think of a way to use black cloth convincingly, you could probably use gauze IF you want some parts to show the window setting. Bright window sets like that often get roller blinds that are semi permeable to light and always have bright spill around the edges. What I mean by that is, don't wait for the blinds, they probably won't help anyway!


D0n
D0n's picture
Last seen: 4 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 11/09/2007 - 5:28pm

get your a$$ out of bed early or stay up late.. 1/2 hour before sunset or after sunrise the light levels will balance between the artificial and ambient exterior light sources.
then there are black screens called scrims you could use over the windows...


Jack Wolcott's picture
Last seen: 9 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 01/02/2008 - 11:51pm
Plus Member

I like Bruce's idea a lot, and yours as well. Black construction plastic or a similar material will tape up to the windows fairly easily and cut out all the light. I've even used split open black 30 gallon plastic bags in a pinch. They look terrible but don't show so it doesn't matter.

Or use black gauze, as Bruce suggests, taped right to the windows. An even more durable material is the fine-mesh plastic screening that's available to replace window screens in a home. The nice thing about the screening is that it can be reused over and over.

If you use either of these methods you're faced with the necessity of lighting the entire scene for a 5 second clip. I'd try turning out all the artificial lights and looking at the scene lit only with natural lighting coming through the window, using a reflector to bounce some of the outside light into the dark areas.

Seems to me it's essential that you shoot with your back to the windows, no matter what you choose.

Let us know how you choose to deal with this. It's an interesting problem and an awful space to shoot in.

Jack


daxalain5's picture
Last seen: 3 years 1 month ago
Joined: 09/20/2011 - 7:24pm

@Bruce: I am thinking the same too. I would probably need a big black gauze material to cover the big windows and use gaffers or duct tape to secure it. Thanks!

@Don: I though of that too but remember that I have some people in my shot. I don't think they want to either wake up early or be there late just for that certain shot. If you know what I mean...


daxalain5's picture
Last seen: 3 years 1 month ago
Joined: 09/20/2011 - 7:24pm

@Jack: Thanks for the nice input! With the reflector idea, I think that would be a challenge because I don't have that much of a space to work on. They ask me to do a 30 sec video commercial where I need to show the entire place without any people in it. This will be a week before the scene with the business people and this will give me time to do some test shots for the place (blocking the windows and using natural/artificial light).

I will try to show you guys some of the test shots when it's done.

:)


D0n
D0n's picture
Last seen: 4 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 11/09/2007 - 5:28pm

can you get some flexibility in your shooting schedule? try for an overcast or rainy day... if not, the most powerful lightsource is nearly always available... use a big mirror (or silver car window shades) to reflect the sun into your set and bounce the light off the ceiling or a light colored wall... with careful aiming, you can get that reflected sunlight deep into the room and balance your interior with your exterior quite nicely...


daxalain5's picture
Last seen: 3 years 1 month ago
Joined: 09/20/2011 - 7:24pm

DOn: Unfortunately, it does not rain here a lot because we are in the desert (Nevada) and right now it's summer time so the sun rises around 5 am then sets around 9:30 pm. I might be able to try and use some reflectors but I doubt that I will have enough space to do it. I really like that idea though of using the silver car windows shades idea so we'll see if that will work. I will be doing test shots and I will include that to my lists. Thanks!