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Final Cut Pro versus Adobe Premiere Pro

summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

I've never been on any forum of any type for any reason, so if I'm asking a question that's been asked, I apologize. I couldn't find it. I've read several posts comparing editing packages, and have determined that for my purposes, FCP and APP are the best two options for me. But, I have one more question which will make my decision for me:

Which editing software is more intuitive to use?

I ask this from the perspective of someone who took Java programming classes in college and really struggled with them. I never really excelled at math (had to take calculus twice), and tend to think of myself as a right-brained thinker. I am an actor who is trying to edit his own videos for the very first time. Once I know what I'm doing, I'm fine, but I definitely would prefer the most intuitive approach, knowing that there will be a plenty steep learning curve with either platform.

Thanks in advance to anyone kind enough to respond to my question.

-Sean


Charles Schultz's picture
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 10:38pm

Why not check out the tutorials on YouTube for editing with both programs and see which one you will think is easiest. Personally, I prefer Premiere Pro but that is not to say that FCP is not a decent program and from what I have heard, once you get one down it is pretty easy to switch between the two. There is also a pretty good thread here on VM that you may want to check out.

http://www.videomaker.com/community/forums/topic/final-cut-pro-vs-adobe-premiere-pro


MediaFish's picture
Last seen: 1 year 3 months ago
Joined: 05/25/2011 - 2:06pm

Download the trial version of Adobe Premiere Pro and take it for a spin. Over the years I have used just about every content editing package that has been on the market - less Avid. I just upgraded to CS5.5 Premiere Production Pro about 6 months back and honestly - its one of the best packages for the money we have used so far.

Getting familiar with some of the advanced features can be daunting however the package is intuitive enough that you can cut your first video almost out of the box - there is an option that allows you to import the content clips then with the push of a button create a baseline sequence of your clips in the order you want with the transitions etc you want, then drop it on the timeline. Then you can go in and adjust your clips as desired - this is actually a good way to get familiar with what can be done with some of the basic features. When I cut scouting sports videos I use this option to create the baseline timeline then go in and make the cuts to the timeline - it makes it very quick to get something cut if it needs to be done quickly (many times at football games by the time the game is over and the team is in the locker room I will have an initial timeline laid down for the coach before he gets on the bus).

But, your best bet is to try it out before you buy it.

Jeff Media Fish Productions


Kenkyusha's picture
Last seen: 1 year 2 weeks ago
Joined: 09/22/2011 - 6:46pm

 As the gents above suggest, check out tutorials online and test drive- both Adobe and Apple (at least for FCP X) will allow you 30-day trials.  'Most intuitive' can be a tricky thing, but don't be intimidated by the potential for a learning curve.

Just like any other skill, editing (without regard to your tool of choice) evolves- the better you get at spotting your areas of weakness, the faster and more efficient you become.  At some point, whichever software you choose should provide you the most flexibility and latitude to bring your vision to the screen.


summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

Thank you all very much for your feedback, and Charles for your directing me to that other thread.

It sounds like I'm going to face a similar learning curve with either, but from what I've been reading last night and this morning, Adobe might be better for me in the long run due to it's ability to accommodate more particular preferences as I advance my skills.

I will take the advice though and check out the trial software before jumping in one direction. Worst case scenario, I make a choice I'm not ultimately happy with, switch to the other and carry the knowledge from one over to the other as you all have intimated is fairly reasonable.

Thanks again.

-Sean


summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

One more question actually...for basic video editing, would I need the Adobe Creative Suite (expensive), or would I be fine with just Premiere Pro (less expensive)?


Kenkyusha's picture
Last seen: 1 year 2 weeks ago
Joined: 09/22/2011 - 6:46pm

 For the most basic stuff, you may be able to get away with Premiere Elements (+/-$100), but you'll outgrow it quickly.  The advantage of the Production Premium bundle is how much other stuff you get with it (Photoshop, Flash, After Effects, Encore, Audition, Illustrator, etc.) and how well all of the tools integrate.  BTW, if you're a student or teacher, Adobe offers a fantastic deal on the package.


ginsek's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 11:18pm

If are a new user and you are asking about basic editing, about ease of use and if you care about the value for money and if you are a mac user - FCP X is way to go. It only costs $300 vs $800 for Premiere.I've used Adobe Premiere, Final Cut Pro 7 and should say that I have least experience with FCP X, but it is much easier to use. I'm not even talking about the interface - FCP X looks and feels way better than any other video editing software. Either way you shouldn't make decision without trying both of them for yourself.


summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

I will work with the trial versions, but to use FCP X, I would need a MAC, which I currently don't own. I'm about to purchase a machine, and was hoping to get a machine after knowing which software I preferred. I guess I'll have to make that decision first.


Charles Schultz's picture
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 10:38pm

That may be a good idea, Premiere Pro works on both PC's and Mac's but you have to have the version for the machine. I switched to a Mac a few months ago and after a little bit of a learning curve, I will never own another PC.


D0n
D0n's picture
Last seen: 4 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 11/09/2007 - 5:28pm

for those concerned about final cut pro x, let me share with you a little info..

I've been trying the the trial version... I'm a believer, it is the future.

it is also not quite ready for prime time.... but Apple is working on it and taking every complaint seriously. Here is my result, two days after filing a bug report:

"Hi Don-

This is Noah from Apple. We recently received your feedback regarding Final Cut Pro X. You mentioned you were having issues importing large clips from a Pentax KR. If you're open to it, we'd really appreciate your assistance in diagnosing the issue.

Best,

Noah"

by email, also sent instructions to load the files and documents to Apple's server.

I never EVER got that kind of service from Adobe.

FWTW

Don


summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

Charles, this is the most helpful feedback I've received about a MAC. The forum discussions I've read through that cover the pros and cons of PC vs MAC have tended to just sound like stubborness on both sides. My hesitation has only been that PC is my only experience. If you, who are obviously a competent PC user, and a long-time PC user can be that sold on a MAC after only a few months, then I think that's going to be my best option.


fuccisphotos's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/01/2011 - 11:25pm

Sean, I was a pc person fr years. I grew up on dos. I ended up getting a job that only used macs. I was frustrated at first, but grew love them. I will never buy a pc again if I can avoid it.


summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

Excellent to hear. I have used a MAC only occasionally. I hated it:). But you inspire me with confidence to try it out. Worst case scenario, I never like it, and buy a pc a few years down the road for my next machine:). I think I'm going the MAC route.


summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

I need some additional counsel. Since deciding to go with MAC, I'm considering getting a MacBook Pro to start instead of the Mac Pro. This is to allow me to edit video on site. I am doing very basic projects with this (3-5 minute finished clips). I've also learned that I can speed the process up by getting a video card, but I was wondering if this would be necessary for the smallish projects I'll be editing. If I go the laptop route, would that even be an option?

Any thoughts?

Thanks,

Sean


D0n
D0n's picture
Last seen: 4 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 11/09/2007 - 5:28pm

I edit on a macbook pro with 8 gigs of ram.... I realize it isn't the fastest solution, but it does work and is plenty fast for me.


grinner's picture
Last seen: 6 years 10 months ago
Joined: 12/29/2007 - 2:56am

Both of em are fine and easy to use. Tou'll find basic projects can be used between the two via xml. I often takes rough cuts from one to the other seemlessly.

Because FCP is no more, you'll sooner or later be looking elsewhere. Adobe is a fine place to be looking.

If buying fresh, I see no reason to dink with FCP.


Charles Schultz's picture
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 10:38pm

Personally, I would get the Creative Suite, it has everything you need including After Effects and Photoshop and trust me, they come in handy.


summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

Charles, picked up an iMac. It seems very capable. I'm now starting the frightening process of trying to understand data conversion processes to allow me to practice editing video that comes in a variety of carriers...dvd, blu-ray, flash drive are the main ones.


Charles Schultz's picture
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 10:38pm

Welcome to Mac world, in a very short time you will look at a pc and say what is that. Did you go with Adobe or FCP?


Charles Schultz's picture
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 10:38pm

I can help if you need assistance. E-mail is Charles@cschultzmedia.com or you can call 314-482-4494 US. I was scared as hell at first but after about 1 week felt right at home with the Mac.


EarlC's picture
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Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am
Plus Member Moderator

Also, regarding Final Cut Pro X, they now offer improvements over the original release that has a few pros in the industry once again feeling somewhat happy.


composite1's picture
Last seen: 7 months 1 week ago
Joined: 12/11/2008 - 7:54pm
Plus Member Moderator

"... in a very short time you will look at a pc and say what is that?"

Ha! Total opposite for me. However, Sean which editing setup did you decide on?

H.Wolfgang Porter, Composite Media Producer Dreaded Enterprises Unlimited, Inc. www.dreadedenterprises.com


summers's picture
Last seen: 2 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/03/2011 - 8:13am

I'm currently running trial versions of Premiere Pro and FCP X on my iMac. So new, I have no idea which one I'll end up running with yet.


EarlC's picture
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Joined: 10/15/2008 - 1:15am
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If a video producer/editor can afford them, nothing wrong with having several tools. Almost ALL editing programs have their strengths and weaknesses. If you're able to work with them all, nothing wrong with having all the tools you can afford.


composite1's picture
Last seen: 7 months 1 week ago
Joined: 12/11/2008 - 7:54pm
Plus Member Moderator

"... Nothing wrong with having several tools."

That's certainly the truth. I'm a big Avid fan but my old setup can't do HD. Now, I roll with Premiere Pro and Vegas. Vegas primarily for short format stuff that doesn't need a lot of finishing or effects work and Premiere for longer form and in concert with AFX for compositing. As Earl implied, you'll learn them both and decide what suits your need at the time you need it.

H.Wolfgang Porter, Composite Media Producer Dreaded Enterprises Unlimited, Inc. www.dreadedenterprises.com


efiebke's picture
Last seen: 6 months 1 week ago
Joined: 03/31/2010 - 8:09am
Plus Member

I have both and both get the job done. Now, which is the most "intuitive"?? I'd say, Sony's Vegas Pro video editing program! LOL! I've owned earlier versions of Vegas since before Sony bought this program. I learned basic video editing on the earlier versions of Vegas (forgot its previous name if it had one) when it wasowned by Sonic Foundry. The work-flow for Vegas (at least the earlier versions by Sonic Foundry and Sony) is intuitive while both Premiere and Final Cut Pro is much less so (in my humble opinion).

For good or for bad, I invested a good amount of $$$$ in Apple computers (Mac Pro & MacBook Pro). I did this for Apple's Logic Pro DAW. (I've used Logic since it was owned by eMagic, when it was on the PC side.) Using an Apple computer so that I can use Logic Pro was well worth the investment of time and money. Because of this, though, I decided to go "Apple all the way" and invested more money in FCP, leaving Vegas and PC computers behind. Only recently did I purchase Adobe's Production Suite programs as part of a cross-grade offer as a FCP user. (Paid about half the price for this group of programs.) In my opinion, Premiere is the least intuitive to use. However, it functions well with the rest of the Suite which is nice.

IMHO, for simple video editing, I recommend Vegas Pro. Videographers make a living using this program. It seems that many people would agree that the editing work-flow is very user-friendly; that it's work-flow is very intuitive, requiring 1 or 2 less steps to get cross-fades, etc.

To be clear, though. . . ALL programs "get the work done". As others have mentioned, if it's possible, audition them. I believe all have "trial periods" where you can give them a run and see if you like their work-flow. If I was still working with PC computers, I'd probably be still working with the latest version Vegas Pro.

Just sharing some random thoughts and providing another choice for a video editing program. :)


efiebke's picture
Last seen: 6 months 1 week ago
Joined: 03/31/2010 - 8:09am
Plus Member

Apologies. . . should have read the entire thread. I see that you already made a decision.

Apologies. . . (Note to self: Read the ENTIRE thread before responding. LOL!)



Charles Schultz's picture
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 10:38pm

If you have a licensed FCP Avid on the cheap may be the way to go $900 for the full version at this time. To have Avid on one machine with PP and FCP would be sweet but I have not invested into FCP from all the reviews of a dying prospect as FCP.

Earl maybe right, they may have brought it up to professional standards at this time gut when it came out it was a joke of a program. I do know there are limitations for transitions with Adobe on a MAC which is kind of weird as it was first a MAC program but it has fewer transitions on the MAC version than a PC. Sorry, never played with the Sony program to tell you otherwise.


aburke3's picture
Last seen: 1 year 4 months ago
Joined: 11/30/2008 - 10:00pm

Final Cut Pro X is much more intuitive to use, IMHO.

However, as your projects and skills progress, I'd reinvestigate your needs accordingly. Premiere Pro CS5.5 and other NLEs have some great features that you might want. And FCPX has some features that you may not want to live without! :)

-Andrew


Rick Crampton's picture
Last seen: 4 months 1 week ago
Joined: 08/20/2009 - 1:08pm

" Empowerment " implies that the average person can achieve anything given the right tools.One can record a hit album with Garage Band in their bedroom . . . One can create a hit movie with cheap/free editing software . . . ANYone can do it, right? How many professionals in the sound or video industriesare there? How many sales of hardware & softwaredo they represent? How many potential sales are represented by the millions of consumer/would-be producers?

George Lucas, back in the 80's, came up with the Edit-Droid, a very expensive post production edit suite. His reasoning was that there were about 2500 editors in post production and that he could sell his machines for around $ 200,000. That may be a lot of money, but once you've saturated your market, then what? He canned the project.

Avid was the defacto NLE at one time. Having saturated their market, customer support went to Hell because there wasn't enough on-going revenue to keep anyone answering the phones.

So let's hear it for Steve Jobs who was smart enough to realize that there's a whole lot more money to be made in the " consumer " realm than there is in the " professional " realm!

Rick Crampton


jeanstarlin@gmail.com's picture
Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: 12/16/2012 - 12:19pm

Hi all,

I've enjoyed reading all your comments as I'm facing some of the same issues.

I have an IMac and am using IMovie and love some of there themes but want many more to use. In my research I can't see that FinaCut ProX or Adobe has any of these. Do they and am I missing something? Do you know where I might be able to get more of these themes?

Thanks,

Jean