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digital Noise while shooting video with the 5d in a nightclub

Original's picture
Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: 04/24/2011 - 2:46am

I shoot video in the clubs and most of the time i use either the hvx 200 or the canon hfs 20. i have no problem with these cameras wen it comes to digital noise due to low light. However, wen i attempt to use the 5d mark 2 no matter what i do, i always seem to get plenty of noise in the video, i see ppl use the 50d 60d and the 7d, i dont know how their footage comes out b.u.t im assuming its coming out better than mine. when i had this problem with the hvx or the hfs i just limited the agc to 9 and that solved the problem, no more noise. i dont know how to resolve this issue with the 5d it seems that the camera is boosting the iso or sumn in order to compensate for the low light however its just making things worse with the noise. Can someone pls help me????????



Rob Grauert's picture
Last seen: 7 months 4 weeks ago
Joined: 02/16/2008 - 10:47pm

Since I don't have that much experience with HDSLRs, I don't know if you can shoot on automatic settings. If you can, then yes, the camera is probably boosting the ISO, which causes more noise.

If you're shooting with full manual control, there are certain ISO settings that are better than others. Use ISOs that are multiples of 160.

Also, the 24-105 is an F4.0 lens. Maybe try using a Canon 50mm F1.2


composite1's picture
Last seen: 5 months 4 weeks ago
Joined: 12/11/2008 - 7:54pm
Plus Member Moderator

Rob's right. If you're shooting on full auto, turn it off. Do it now. Also, he's right about your lens speed. 4.0 is too low to do low-light work. You'll need a 50mm (normal angle) or better wide-angle lens with a lens speed of 2.8 or better.

H.Wolfgang Porter, Composite Media Producer Dreaded Enterprises Unlimited, Inc. www.dreadedenterprises.com


Kenkyusha's picture
Last seen: 11 months 1 week ago
Joined: 09/22/2011 - 6:46pm

 Check ISO, shutter speed and, as the gents above mention, get yourself faster lenses (there are f2.8 zooms, but they tend to be pricey).  You can get a nifty/thrifty fifty (50mm f1.8) for around $80 in many places- this will be money well spent for work in low light.


ricks's picture
Last seen: 2 years 11 months ago
Joined: 10/12/2011 - 12:43pm

Shoot in manual. Shutter speed of 60 if you're shooting 30FPS. Shutter of 50 if you're shooting 24fps. ISO should be as low as you can go and still get it to read what you need. Noise is a result of shooting at too high an ISO. Anything over ISO3200 is "too much" noise. 2400 should be enough without too much noise.

I occasionally blog on the 5D: www.rickseefried.tumblr.com

Nightclub vids I shot with the 5D:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OEHJo4Cv_U

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GgMi7sfVkY

www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_VA4VA0sDY


MediaFish's picture
Last seen: 1 year 2 months ago
Joined: 05/25/2011 - 2:06pm

1. Turn off auto mode.

2. Set ISO Speed manually - READ THIS -> http://terragalleria.com/blog/2011/03/22/best-iso-for-low-noise-on-canon-5d-mk2/

3. ISO settings on the 5Dmk2 does matter just as it does on 50D, 60D, 7D. As pointed out by Vincent LaForet you should shoot at multiples of ISO 160 on these camera for the lowest noise.

4. 2.8 f/stop or less(1.x) a must.

Jeff Media Fish Productions



Original's picture
Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: 04/24/2011 - 2:46am

@RickS , thank u for your input, however, i must be way off becuz i go no where near 2400 iso setting. i have it at like 320 and i still get grain in the night with no video light, however the scene appears lit as it is accept for the noise.


Original's picture
Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: 04/24/2011 - 2:46am

Thanks to everyone who responded, it just seems as if its no easy way. i just think wen u press record on the 5d it does what the hell it wants lol



composite1's picture
Last seen: 5 months 4 weeks ago
Joined: 12/11/2008 - 7:54pm
Plus Member Moderator

"i just think wen u press record on the 5d it does what the hell it wants...."

That is a massive 'Negative' my friend.

If you just want to point and shoot, get a Flip Camera. Don't bother spending all the money for a 5D and necessary accessories. The camera as Grinner said, can only do what you tell it to. Once you understand how the light around you works and the best ways to adjust, it is 'easy'.

H.Wolfgang Porter, Composite Media Producer Dreaded Enterprises Unlimited, Inc. www.dreadedenterprises.com


Original's picture
Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: 04/24/2011 - 2:46am

Well, Moderator i wouldn't consider investing in a flip, cuz like i sed a already have and hvx 200,that i can use without experiencing that problem. and although i appreciate your advice on how to invest my money, im ok in that dept. My concern is this 5d, its settings and how to get it to do what i need it to do under certain lighting situations.


composite1's picture
Last seen: 5 months 4 weeks ago
Joined: 12/11/2008 - 7:54pm
Plus Member Moderator

Understood. I also teach photography and most of my students have the latest rigs and a few sport the higher-end Canons and Nikons. That's the standard opening line from my lectures when I hear them say the very things you did. There's a huge difference between your dedicated video camera and the hybrid you're using. Not only do you have to contend with working the video, you must have working knowledge of how a still camera operates. The point we all were making is yes, the camera does have 'auto' settings but they will only get what they were programed to do. Which BTW, will often not be what you need. The way you get around that is learn how the other functions particularly the Manual settings work and what light conditions call for specific settings. You'll never do that in Full Auto.

H.Wolfgang Porter, Composite Media Producer Dreaded Enterprises Unlimited, Inc. www.dreadedenterprises.com


Original's picture
Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: 04/24/2011 - 2:46am

well from what i understand, from youtube and reading a few blogs on the 5d there are certain limitations as far as the control you have over certain setting in video mode such as the aperture. In still mode i have no problem, i set the camera to manual and all the setting respond accordingly, however in video mode if i change the aperture, i dont notice any change in the performance of the equiptment. Ive seen tutorials that suggest that u have to trick the camera by offsetting the lens fixture. Trust me, i know there is whole lot that i have to learn and i'm by no means doubting what any of you guys are saying, i just want to know am i missing something as far as the settings are concerned other than the camera modes settings that will give me complete control of camera in video mode. (i always keep the camera mode in manual)


MediaFish's picture
Last seen: 1 year 2 months ago
Joined: 05/25/2011 - 2:06pm

Have you checked to ensure you have the latest firmware updates etc? This past Friday we shot a diner scene at night, rather low light, with a Canon 7D - little brother to 5D, and the video was great, low noise and we couldn't ask any more from the camera. I think we were at iso 800 and not sure of the f/stop. Regardless, the video was low noise and looked great. You might want to run some test using different ISO in the same setting to see if there is a difference in the amount of noise - there should be.

I can tell you this - these cameras are hybrids and you have to put the time in to set them up which means doing test shots to see what works best otherwise you don't always get what you are expecting. We learned that the hardway.

Jeff Media Fish Productions


Original's picture
Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: 04/24/2011 - 2:46am

u know what im starting to think, when i wuz unsatisfied with the quality of the picture in low light, the targets are rather far in distance. if i'm 3 to 10 ft from the target oh its beautiful. however when i have my problem if the target is beyond 75ft then it starts to get messy. im wondering whats the science on that. and if there is a way to shoot far targets in low light with little to no noise.


Kenkyusha's picture
Last seen: 11 months 1 week ago
Joined: 09/22/2011 - 6:46pm

 That will pose a problem- most zoom lenses are not fixed aperture.  Fast (fixed focal) primes can do the trick- a 135mm f2.8 can be picked-up for not too much money and may dramatically improve your PQ.




David Forrester's picture
Last seen: 3 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 05/09/2010 - 8:04pm
Plus Member

I have the 5DM2 and the low light issue has been a thorn. Like the others have stated, the cleanest max is 1250 - 1600 tops otherwise you get a window screen line effect and noise - not pretty.  You can go to 1/30 second in a pinch, and might even get some interesting nice mini-blur which is OK for what you are doing. I would.  

 

I always use prime lenses at f1.4 - 2. Keep it wide angle - 21-28 mm to solve the next problem: You are going to have a bitch of a time keeping your subjects in sharp focus. You will be follow focusing like crazy and trust me, 2/3 of your stuff will be out of focus because you are working at close quarters and the camera full frame sensor.  That is the beauty of small sensors like the 7D or triple chip 1/3" cams (except the are crappy in low light where the 5D shines!!)  - they are gorgeous in deep focus.  See - you can't win!  

 

So what is the solution?  18-28 mm lens, f 2 or better, 1/30, a 3X scope / viewer (Hoodman) on the back, set you focus at a certain distance (say 6') and keep that distance to the subject. If the subject moves - you move with it (sure helps).  Take lots and lots of takes because you will have a ton of mis-takes guaranteed. Numbers win here. Don't use a zoom ever unless it is a wide angle and big f stop.  Primes are the only way to go.  

 

Have the night club turn on more lights if at all possible (doubt it)  Lighting is your answer to super clean video for the 5D, although I have taken awesome video in a concert, got up close with a 180  F2.8 and the subject was well lit with black bacgrounds.  Blew me away in fact. Sound sucked, but we all know that anyway.

 

Then process with a program called neat video. It is excellent for removing noise and adding sharpness etc.  Many other softwared pkgs such as Sony Vegas and Adobe have these, but I think a dedicated noise remover is the best way to salvage a clean image. 

 

Cheers, Take 5