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AVCHD - Full HD - DVD - Help!

NoWire360's picture
Last seen: 6 years 2 months ago
Joined: 08/12/2008 - 3:36am

Hello, Any Vegas expert out there that can help me out. All I want is to burn my edited (simple title, transition) AVCHD files to a regular DVD disc and keep the 1920x1080 resolution.

I've been pulling my hair tying to figure this out. DVD Architect doesn't seem to support HD resolution, as it always wants to resample my video to DVD resolution. The closest thing I came to a solution is to click "make movie" >"Burn it to a DVD, Blu-ray disc, or CD. > "Blu-ray disc". I tried both video format, and the program was able to burn without errors. While I can play the DVD on my PC (stutter and all), my PS3 doesn't seem to see it as a "movie" disc, but instead a DATA disc.

That said, it wont play the disc automatically. I can go through the folder, and into to the "Stream" folder. I can click the file there, and it will play, but that doesn't seem right. Oh, and there are only two choice for burn speed (1.0x, and 2.0x) instead of the actual 24.0x speed. Anyway, please advise. I was using pinnacle studio 12 prior to Vegas, and I believe Pinnacle can burn full HD content on a regular DVD without a problem. If only Pinnacle can handle AVCHD files without begging for mercy (even on my Quad system).

I'm really liking Vegas, and will probably switch, but I'm getting frustrated about this particular issue. I'm pretty sure there's a away (short of getting the PRO version, which I really don't need), someone just need to point me in the right direction.

Thank you in advance.

FYI:

Camera = Canon HF10


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 2 years 1 month ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
Plus Member Moderator

Simply put, you cannot burn 1920 X 1080 to regular DVD - To do that you need a BluRay Disc burner or (shudder) HD/DVD burner. DVD's are only capable of playing at 720 X 480 @ 29.97 FPS (in the US at least - NTSC).

You can however keep the aspect ratio and burn it as a NTSC widescreen (16:9) DVD -Just select this as your output from Vegas when rendering and burn.

EDIT - Many standard DVD players are capable of upconverting to HD now.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


bizzy's picture
Last seen: 5 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/04/2008 - 11:22am

Am new here and want to buy the Sony HDR S11 coz of its full HD capabilities. (hope am right on that). birdcat,does that mean I wont be able to burn on regular DVD coz thats what I intend to use?


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 2 years 1 month ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
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Am new here and want to buy the Sony HDR S11 coz of its full HD capabilities. (hope am right on that). birdcat,does that mean I wont be able to burn on regular DVD coz thats what I intend to use?

You will not be able to burn anything more than 720 X 480 (SD for DVD) onto a standard video DVD - You could always put a HD video on a data DVD and play it on a computer (but remember you are limited by size 4.7 GB or 9 GB). If you want a true high def video disc, you have two options currently - BluRay or HD DVD (which is obsolete now but I'm sure you can still get burners & players but why would you want to?).

However, there is nothing to stop you from burning 16:9 SD standard DVD's from any source you'd like, including full HD (1920 X 1080). I do this all the time - my NLE (Vegas Pro 8) converts it on the fly and I burn a standard def DVD from HD source just like I do for SD source.

Hope this answers your question.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


bizzy's picture
Last seen: 5 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/04/2008 - 11:22am

Could i face problems in buying HDR S11 instead of HDR S11ewhich hasPAL as the analog video format? I am not inthe US where NTSC is the standard but having seen a conversion feature in some softwares,is ita gud ideato go for HDR S11?



sarkyfooker's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/13/2008 - 3:05pm

Hi Bizzy,

I just went through the same questions myself...Ive bought an SR11 PAL system,and after some testing,solved the problem as described above by birdcat,the only difference is that it would be 720x576 @25 Fps, as far as I understand thats the difference between PAL and NTSC.Anyway I would strongly reccomend the camera,I bought it for underwater use mainly,and Im amazed at the definition,plus many controls can be assigned to a sort of custombuttom/wheel and it allows for some manual control.The high speed slow motion feature is also quite impressive.A buy I dont regret at all...good luck!


bizzy's picture
Last seen: 5 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/04/2008 - 11:22am

hi sarkyfooker,which one records in 720x576 mode,NTSC or PAL?


sarkyfooker's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/13/2008 - 3:05pm

That would be PAL. MAKE SURE that youve got software that can handle the .M2ts files.Obviously Sony Vegas does,as well as Premiere CS4,to my knowledge all the others still dont. You also need a powerful machine,Im using a core 2 duo with 2GHZ and 2 GB ram,and it struggles quite a bit,but its a laptop.Still loving the camera,just shot a small promo video for a gym with it.Its not outstanding in low light...

Hope Ive been of some help,now go out and buy it !!!


bizzy's picture
Last seen: 5 years 12 months ago
Joined: 11/04/2008 - 11:22am

thanks sarky...we are kind of on the same line. I already have vegas pro 8, and a core 2 duo desktop. I need to up the RAM from 1 to 2 GB though. My main issue here is PAL camcorders are a little bit costly (upto 300 dollars more) compared to the NTSC models. Thats why I have to be sure whether theres much of a difference.


sarkyfooker's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/13/2008 - 3:05pm

No problem,experiences are made to be shared :).I can only tell you the PAL side of the story though...

If it can help I got my one from Adorama for 1049 $ it was delivered to the other side of the Atlantic 7 days after the order.Theres no price for the NTSC model on their website though.I would upgrade to something more if its a desktop.Ill do some research but I think that a Quad core with 4 GB Ram should handle the AVCHD files quite well.Ill let you know if I find out anything worth sharing.


jrcromwell's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/17/2008 - 2:56pm

Simply put, you cannot burn 1920 X 1080 to regular DVD - To do that you need a BluRay Disc burner or (shudder) HD/DVD burner. DVD's are only capable of playing at 720 X 480 @ 29.97 FPS (in the US at least - NTSC). You can however keep the aspect ratio and burn it as a NTSC widescreen (16:9) DVD -Just select this as your output from Vegas when rendering and burn. EDIT - Many standard DVD players are capable of upconverting to HD now.

Something seems amiss here, perhaps it is the term "regular DVD." Do you mean using the "DVD format" or the "4.7 Gb disk" ? Based on my web research (not my experience), it appears that AVCHD video can be written to a 4.7 Gb disk using programs like Roxio Toast 9, and that these "AVCHD disks" can be played in hi-def on some players like the PSP3. It is being widely touted as a cheaper process than burning to expensive blu-ray disks using expensive blu-ray burners (assuming you already have a Sony PSP3). ???


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 2 years 1 month ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
Plus Member Moderator

There are many DVD (not only BluRay) players that will "upconvert" a standard (4.7 or 9GB disc) to play in a simulated HD on HD televisions. They are not really playing in full HD.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


jrcromwell's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/17/2008 - 2:56pm

No, I was not referring to upconverting. Roxio Toast 9 claims to provides a way (warning: long URL):

http://mymoments.roxio.com/enu/articles/mac/burning_&_copy,video/2008/09/burning_highdef_dvds__bluray_discs_with_toast_9.html


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 2 years 1 month ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
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Interesting - I read the article. Only problem is it still requires a BluRay player and HDTV.

With Toast 9 and its High-Def/Blu-ray Disc Plug-in, you can burn your HD camcorder footage onto regular DVD media, in the same format as Blu-ray video, using the DVD burner you already have. These special high-definition DVDs can be played in most Blu-ray set-top players, including the Sony PlayStation 3, and you can fit up to an hour of HD video onto a dual-layer DVD.

Not a bad deal but if I had the DVD player and HDTV, I'd be da**ed sure I'd also have a BD burner - They are getting cheaper each day (newegg.com has one for under $200) - The only problem right now is the price of the blanks and they should be down to a couple of buck each (in quantity) within a couple of years if not sooner.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


GARoss's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/13/2008 - 12:43pm

Birdcat's quotes,"Simply put, you cannot burn 1920 X 1080 to regular DVD."Yes, you can!"You will not be able to burn anything more than 720 X 480 (SD for DVD) onto a standard video DVD."Sorry, not true. AVCHD DVD's are HD & compatible on some Blu-ray players, but not all. BDMV is another style of DVD that full HD can be recorded on DVD media & playable in full HD on some Blu-ray players. Naturally, the disc will not play on standard DVD players.My PC only hasa DVD burner & I was able to burnfull 1920x1080 HD as a AVCHDDVD project (edited & rendered with Vegas 8 @ 29.97 frames interlaced or 24P as well) using Nero Vision that played perfectly on my Panasonic DMP-BD30K Blu-ray player in full HD, no up conversion as you suggest. Nero renders AVCHDDVDs @14Mbps only & D/L DVDs can hold 70-75 minutes of AVCHD video. It does support separate audio/videostreams. The software is very DVD-like as it supports 1st play video to main menu, chapter pages & highlited buttons. I'm also aware that several other software makers support this format as well including ArcSoft TotalMedia Extreme.My editing software is Sony Vegas 8 Pro & I have also tried this with Sony DVD A5, but, it only supports BDMV which is incompatible with my player. BDMV DVDs are better in the sincehigher bitrates can be used +wider audio support at the cost of shorted video time. I understand BDMV DVDsare compatiblewith some Blu-ray players, being its Sony software probably Sony Blu-ray players, but I can't state that as fact! Their players also support BDAV, which as I understand it, is AVCHD camcorder video recorded in full HD on a DVD without 1st play & menus.The point is why buy a Blu-ray burner when you can do thiswith your DVD burner? The highest bitrate for a pro AVCHD camcorder is 25Mbps, most are consumer AVCHD camcorders are 13-17Mbps.That's perfect for AVCHD. BDMV supports up to 40Mbps so we're talkingHD broadcast cameras &for that you'd need a BD burner to maintain quality!

HTH


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 2 years 1 month ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
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I admit I was wrong here - The question I still have is if you have a BD player and HDTV, why would you not want a BD burner? Do these high definition on regular DVD's look as good as BD? If so, the only drawback I see is the time (the article quoted above claims one hour on a 9GB DL DVD). Since BD is currently 25GB (with 50 out there now), I would think there would be a difference.

Has anyone compared the HD on standard DVD to BluRay?

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


D0n
D0n's picture
Last seen: 4 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 11/09/2007 - 5:28pm

to clear up any confusion:

Roxio software can burn high def video to a dvd, for playback on a blueray player with one caveat:

the sl dvd disc will only hold approx 4 gigs of data, period, one hours worth of high def footage WILL NOT FIT, maybe 20 mins worth , and the disc may not play in all players.



GARoss's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/13/2008 - 12:43pm

All's cool, Birdcat!

The biggest reasonis no additional investment is needed, assuming you own a DVD burner, of coarse. And, 4.7Gbs are less than a $1 a piece @ 16x.

True, some BD burners are now in the mid $100s; the bad news is the media is $5-10 each @ 2x. This is similar to DVDs about 7-8 years ago & the prices will go down.

Look, few people need BD's 50Gb capacity. True,BD can usehigher bitrates but only Pro Camcorders can take advantage of that. So, those who have AVCHD camcorders are recording @ 13-17Mbps & that equals 70-75 minutes of AVCHD content on a D/L DVD @ 14Mbps bitrate, or nearly the same quality as was recorded. That's not bad for little if any investment.

HTH


Proimages's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/30/2008 - 11:37pm

Vegas 8.0 and DVD Architect 5.0 can do it. In Vegas > Tools > Burn Disc > Blu Ray

Keep it at defaults you need to choose DVD 4.7GB and let it run. The DVD will be AVCHD-DVDR and will play in Blu Ray players. You are limited to 4.7GB

DVDA 5.0 is a free upgrade to 4.5


D0n
D0n's picture
Last seen: 4 months 3 weeks ago
Joined: 11/09/2007 - 5:28pm

I don't know. the cost of burners, cost of discs. compatibility issues...

I'm still buying, and giving clients thier media on appletv's......

looks great, easy, and works.


Proimages's picture
Last seen: 5 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/30/2008 - 11:37pm

I made the Blu Ray disc on a three year old computer and standard DVD burner on a $0.40 DVD-R, see the post above. It plays at 1080p, you are limited to about 15 minutes depending on Bit rate. Standard DVD must be 18Mbpsor less. You must have a Blu Ray player for it to work.


MikeAiken's picture
Last seen: 4 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 05/21/2007 - 7:54pm

I do it all the time - I edit in Premiere Pro then create a bluray dvd in Encore, burn that to an iso image and then burn that image to a 29-cent standard 4.7 dvd with Alcohol or Nero. Full 1920 x 1080 on a bluray player and looks as good as the original footage. Sure you're limited to about 15 to 20 minutes on a single layer disk, but for music videos and stage performances after editing that's about all I usually need. I'll probably buy a BD burner in the future when the prices of blanks come way down but I really don't see me needing one even then.


galenfott's picture
Last seen: 4 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/07/2009 - 2:33pm

I'm on the Mac, and am trying to create AVCHD discs in Toast using .iso images from Encore. I can successfully use Toast to create an AVCHD disc that plays 1920x1080 from a standard DVD. I can also create a standard DVD .iso in Encore and burn that to a playable standard DVD using Toast. But I can't create a "Blu-ray" .iso in Encore, and use Toast to burn that to a playable AVCHD disc.

Mike Aiken seems to be doing essentially this, albeit not with Toast. Is there some "trick" or step to it? Is the footage already AVCHD? Mine isn't, and I've wondered if that's the problem. I can kind of see why it WOULDN'T work; Encore doesn't create a Blu-ray image to be AVCHD-compatible, so I'd think the .iso files wouldn't translate. Yet apparently it is possible.

Thanks for any insight anyone can provide.


mailber350's picture
Last seen: 4 years 5 days ago
Joined: 10/26/2010 - 5:59am

Youcan notburn anything more than 720 X 480 (SD for DVD) onto a standard video DVD. I f you would like to get the absolute DVD from AVCHD video from camcorder, you have to choose HD DVD or Blu-ray. If you just want to burn AVCHD video recording to DVD, you can convert AVCHD to AVI or MPEG 2 workable for DVD burer. Personally, I am using Aunsoft MTS Converter which iis able to convert MTS files to any video formats i want to get. The reason i choose it is it flexible output video parameters settings. Following is the detailed guide on burning AVCHD to DVD.

http://www.aunsoft.com/burn-avchd-mts-m2ts-to-dvd-with-idvd-on-mac-os-x/

Hope it is useful.

Mailber


rory cooper's picture
Last seen: 4 years 5 months ago
Joined: 05/24/2010 - 10:53am

Something to take note of.

If you are rendering out FULL HD clips that are not for mass distribution then have a look at full HD media players

They cost the same as DVD players, no discs, no cutting, less hassles, many play MKV files.

I use them for presentations, launches and events and are very convenient and reliable.


cyborg1024's picture
Last seen: 3 years 8 months ago
Joined: 02/21/2011 - 1:39pm

You can burn a full length film in near Blu-ray quality onto a dual layer DVD(AVCHD). Usually they hit around 7GB and will play on most blu-ray players. Also Roxio has a plugin for their suite that can play this format on the PC. These are compressed heavily taking a 40GB movie down to about 7GB, biggest reason do do so would be to save space if archiving your collection or to have a version you could play without scratching up the master disk. Since the size is close to most DVD movies you can store a whole lot of them on a 2TB drive. One app that can do the conversion is Bluray2DVD although Im sure their are others. Personally I dont do this much as I like to backup my std dvd's and mount the ISO's directly in media center. Keeps my kids from scattering their movies on the floor and destroying them. Anything that's in Blu-ray I prefer to keep maximum quality but if your after space savings this will work and can be done. Also whats used to encode is likely the biggest factor on quality. Anyways the quality is very good, certainly higher res than DVD. Only problem with blu-ray images is their is no easy way to mount and play in media center and were in to automation so that even a nanny can do it. Its awesome having your whole collection available at a click of a remote, if someone comes up with a good Blu-ray plugin for Media Center they could make a good bit of dough. For some reason MS left this feature out, granted alot of people rip them into other formats to achieve this but to me the whole point of making an image is to be able to recreate the master disk if it gets damaged, extras and all. Thats why I prefer a 1 to 1 mountable backup, but for Blu-ray this eats large disk drives for breakfast.


The_Jesus_Followa's picture
Last seen: 2 years 11 months ago
Joined: 11/05/2011 - 3:21pm

So didn't anybody give you an answer yet?

1. You shouldn't try to put 1080p videos on a DVD to be played on a DVD player.

2. You CAN though get a very nice quality converting it down to 720x480! That's real I tested it on a 46" TV and it looks nice! (if the video is 8mbps+).

Now what you want to do is to edit your video in Sony Vegas anyway you want and you are going to render the video separated from the audio(which is very quick to render) and let them have the same name so that DVD Architect caches it automatically. How many minutes do you have? If it's less than 60 min don't worry about bit rate and size of rendered video.

Render you video as "DVD Architect NTSC Widescreen video stream" under MainConcept MPEG-2. Note that if you want the best quality you are going to have to make a new profile(scroll down and select Customize Template) and change the bitrate to Constant Bitrate and put 8,000,000 there. Also select "Best" for Video rendering quality under Project. Don't forget to save it with another name and make it your favorite). And render the audio as "Stereo DVD" under Dolby Digital AC-3 Studio.

Then on DVD Architect go to import media and select your video, if your audio is on the same folder that the video is it is going to import the audio automatically. Good luck!

Dude you don't need to switch to Vegas Pro just to do that. Try the trial first if you don't believe me. Vegas PRO is too professional for a non-professional user. I have Vegas Platinum HD Production Suite and I don't need anything else.

I hope I've helped. Please tell us if you have found the answer!

Jesus is the way, the truth and life.
Nobody goes to the father but through Jesus.


theonecanoe's picture
Last seen: 5 days 20 hours ago
Joined: 08/31/2011 - 4:20pm

 I've had great success burning High-definition video onto regular DVD discs as well as double-layer DVD discs using Sony Vegas Pro, version 8 and 10. I burn my complete projects right from the timeline, simply select Tools>Burn Disc>Blu-Ray Disc. You can then choose either MainConcept MPEG 2 or Sony AVC MPG4 codec with bit rates ranging from 8 to 25 Mbps at 1440X1080 or 1920X1080.  I've been able to play these in stand alone Sony and Pioneer Blu-ray players as well as Sony Playstation.  The finished product looks the same as a disc burned with a Blu-ray burner, the only problem for some might be the content length.  Most of my projects are between 10 and 40 min., so I've not had an issue with running out of disc space.

   -Wayne- 


Gregory Watts's picture
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 2:31am

I am a bit confused birdcat, I burn AVCHD at 1920 x 1080 to standard DVD's all the time. i am burning one right now on a double layer DVD, my helicopter footage. When I choose the disc burn settings, it says AVCHD at 1920 x 1080. I then pop the DVD disc in my BD player and the screen says AVCHD, then it plays. When you check the disc the codec information is in fact AVCHD 1920 x 1080. Videostudio X4 Ultimate was one of the first NLE's to support this and the X5 version does as well. You do not need Blu-Ray disc to burn AVCHD or HD 1920 x 1080 to a standard disc. But be aware, AVCHD is far far larger contect. 30 minutes of rendered footage amounts to almost 5GB of content that can't be compressed more because it will not be AVCHD if it was. I use Double Layer DVD's for AVCHD's.

 "A Photo Captures but a Moment in Time: Video Captures a Lifetime in a Moment"


birdcat's picture
Last seen: 2 years 1 month ago
Joined: 10/21/2005 - 10:09am
Plus Member Moderator

@Tasana - Old thread - GARoss pointed out my error three years ago - At the time I didn't know anyone who was doing HD on DVD's (still not too many doing it, since it requires a BD player anyway). Nowadays, I mostly use BD-RE when outputting HD to disc (least amount of player compatibility issues for my equipment), sometimes BD-R but still not DVD.

Bruce Paul 7Squared Productions http://www.7squared.com


Gregory Watts's picture
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 10/25/2010 - 2:31am

I should have looked at the date of the thread. Sorry for the pounce. And you are correct, I too still use DVD standard due to the fact that about 95% of the people I do work for do not own a BD player.

 "A Photo Captures but a Moment in Time: Video Captures a Lifetime in a Moment"